Data Catalog



Sea Surface Temperature Datasets (SST)

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Dataset Name

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Dates Available Spatial Resolution (°) Spatial Resolution
(km - approx.)
Coverage LAS ERDDAP THREDDS
AVHRR Pathfinder v.4.1
& AVHRR GAC
1985 - Apr. 2016
1985 - Apr. 2016
2003 - Apr. 2016
0.1° 8km global monthly
weekly
3-day
monthly
weekly
3-day
monthly
weekly
3-day
The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensors onboard the NOAA POES (Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites) satellite constellation have been collecting sea-surface temperature (SST) measurements since 1981. This dataset combines the NOAA/NASA AVHRR Pathfinder v4.1 dataset (January 1985 - January 2003) and the AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC) dataset (January 2003 - present) to provide a long time series of SST. These datasets are reduced-resolution legacy datasets and will be discontinued by NOAA in 2016. The dataset is composed of SST measurements from descending passes (nighttime). 3-day composites are only available for GAC, from 2003 - 2016.
AVHRR Pathfinder v.5 and v5.1 1981 - 2009 0.05° 4km global monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
The NOAA/NASA AVHRR Pathfinder v5 and v5.1 sea-surface temperature dataset is a reanalysis of historical AVHRR data that have been improved using extensive calibration, validation and other information to yield a consistent research quality time series for global climate studies. At 0.05 degrees per pixel (approximately 4 km/pixel), this dataset provides a global spatial coverage ranging from October 1981 - 2009. Our data holdings include descending passes (nighttime).
GOES 2001 - present 0.05° 4km Hawaii 2-day 2-day 2-day
The radiometer sensors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) collect sea-surface temperature data every 2 hours for the Hawaii region. The GOES satellites operate from two primary locations. GOES East is located at 75° W and provides most of the U.S. weather information. GOES West is located at 135° W over the Pacific Ocean. NOAA also maintains an on-orbit spare GOES satellite in the event of an anomaly or failure of GOES East or GOES West. The high temporal and spatial resolution of the GOES SST dataset allows for the monitoring of oceanographic eddies that occur off the main Hawaiian Islands.
The first in the series of the next generation geostationary satellite, GOES-R, is scheduled to launch in October 2016.
GOES-POES 2012 - present 0.05° 4km global monthly
weekly
2-day
monthly
weekly
2-day
monthly
weekly
2-day
The GOES-POES dataset is a blended product, combining SST information from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) and the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). This global SST analysis provides a daily gap-free map of the foundation sea surface temperature, generating high density SST data and improving the monitoring of small scale dynamic features in the coastal coral reef environment.

Ocean Color Datasets

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Dataset Name

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Variables Dates Available Spatial Resolution (°) Spatial Resolution (km - approx.) Coverage LAS ERDDAP THREDDS
SeaWIFS Chl a conc. 1997 - 2010 0.1° 9km global monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
The NASA SeaWiFS (Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor) sensor onboard the SeaStart spacecraft was used for detecting and measuring global sea-surface chlorophyll-a concentrations throughout the world's oceans from 1997 through 2010. During that time, the satellite was able to establish an unprecedented time series of global chlorophyll-a concentrations. The sensor started experiencing issues around 2008 leading to significant missing data in 2008-2010, so it is recommended to be cautious with data post 2007.
MODIS-Aqua Chl a conc. 2002 - present 0.05° 4km global monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
The MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer) sensor was deployed onboard the NASA Aqua satellite. It is a multi-disciplinary sensor providing data for the ocean, land, aerosol, and cloud research and is used for detecting chlorophyll-a concentrations in the world's oceans, among other applications. Aqua MODIS views the entire Earth's surface every 2 days, acquiring data in 36 spectral bands.
The data available here is the latest reprocessing from June 2015, which NASA undertook to correct for some sensor drift issues. If you are using data that was downloaded prior to December 2015 (when we acquired the reprocessed data), we recommend you re-download the dataset. 2014 and 2015 are the years that were most affected by the sensor issues.
Because of compatibility issues with the new data format used by NASA, MODIS data is not available on our LAS viewer.
NASA-VIIRS Chl a conc. 2012 - present 0.05° 4km global monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
The VIIRS (Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite) instrument was deployed on the Suomi-NPP (Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership) spacecraft in October 2011. Like MODIS, VIIRS is a multi-disciplinary sensor providing data for the ocean, land, aerosol, and cloud research and as with SeaWiFS and MODIS, the VIIRS scan and orbit geometries provide global coverage every two days.
Because of compatibility issues with the new data format used by NASA, VIIRS data is not available on our LAS viewer.

Wind Datasets

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Dataset Name

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Variables Dates Available Spatial
Resolution (°)
Spatial
Resolution
(km - approx.)
Coverage LAS ERDDAP THREDDS
QuikSCAT Wind Stress Curl
Wind Speed Divergence
Wind Speed
Wind Stress
Zonal Wind Stress
Meridional Wind Stress
Zonal Wind Speed
Meridional Wind Speed
1999-2009 0.5° 40km global monthly
weekly
3-day
monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
3-day
In June 1999 NASA launched the Quik Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) satellite containing the SeaWinds radar sensor. This instrument allowed for the retrieval of near-surface wind information over the oceans, and their orbit characteristics allow for a complete coverage of the planet every 24 hours. Our data holdings contain QuikSCAT data provided by the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER).
CCMP Number of observations
U-component of pseudostress at 10 meters
U-wind at 10 meters
V-component of pseudostress at 10 meters
V-wind at 10 meters
Wind speed at 10 meters
1987-2011 0.25° 25km global monthly monthly monthly
The CCMP (Cross-Calibrated Multi-Platform) ocean surface wind vector analyses provide a consistent, gap-free long-term time-series of ocean surface wind vector analysis fields from July 1987 through June 2011. The CCMP datasets combine cross-calibrated satellite winds from a number of microwave satellite radiometers and scatterometers (i.e., SSM/I, SSMIS, AMSR, TMI, WindSat, QuikScat and SeaWinds) to produce a high-resolution (0.25°) gridded analysis. Both radiometer and scatterometer data are validated against ocean moored buoys, which prove the measurements are in excellent agreement (within 0.8 m/s) despite the different instrument measurement dynamics and wind retrieval methodologies.
ASCAT Ocean Wind Speed
Zonal Wind Speed
Meridional Wind Speed
2013 - present 0.25° 25km global 1-day 1-day 1-day
The Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) sensor onboard the EUMETSAT MetOp polar-orbiting satellite provides ocean surface wind observations by means of radar scatterometry.

Altimetry Datasets

Dear OceanWatch users:
As part of a larger effort to overhaul legacy code still in use, a bug was discovered in a legacy script that affects the calculation of dates and files used in the processing of altimetry data. Over the next few days we will continue to review this code to understand the complete impacts to the data, but preliminary results lead us to believe that error affects the sea surface height and geostrophic currents products from 2011 through the present.
Because this error was discovered during attempts to modernize our code, we are working on a fix to the problem, and will restore access to this dataset as soon as it is available.

We are sorry for the inconvenience, and if you have any questions please don't hesitate to contact us. In the meantime, the source data is available at CMEMS (you will need to register for a free account).

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Dataset Name

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Variables Dates Available Spatial
Resolution (°)
Spatial
Resolution
(km - approx.)
Coverage LAS ERDDAP THREDDS
AVISO Multi-Satelite Mission SSH 1993 - 2015 (delayed time - DT)
2015 - present (near-real time - NRT)
0.25° 20km global monthly (DT)
weekly (DT)
weekly (NRT)
monthly (DT)
weekly (DT)
weekly (NRT)
monthly (DT)
weekly (DT)
weekly (NRT)
Ocean altimetry monitoring is conducted primarily by means of data from the NASA TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-1 and JASON-2 satellite missions, in addition to other satellite altimeters (e.g.: ERS, Envisat). By merging their Sea Surface Height (SSH) measurements, it is possible to establish a long record of SSH observations throughout the world's oceans. The SSH data used is the AVISO Delayed-Time Reference Mean Sea-Level Anomaly (MSLA) product that combines data from TOPEX/Poseidon/ERS, Jason-1/Envisat and Jason-2/Envisat. In addition, the AVISO Near Real-Time MSLA Jason-2 dataset is also used for supplementing the Delayed-Time products when these are unavailable. Due to license constraints, AVISO altimetry products are reported as anomalies from the 1992-2002 climatology of Niiler et al. 2003. The resulting dataset contains global data at a spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees.
AVISO Multi-Satelite Mission U
V
1993 - 2015 (delayed time - DT)
2015 - present (near-real time - NRT)
0.5° 40km global monthly (DT)
weekly (DT)
weekly (NRT)
monthly (DT)
weekly (DT)
weekly (NRT)
monthly (DT)
weekly (DT)
weekly (NRT)
Using sea-surface height information (described above), geostrophic currents (U and V components) are subsequently derived following the methods by Polovina et al. (1999). The resulting dataset contains global data at a spatial resolution of 0.5 degrees.

Sea Surface Salinity Datasets

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Dataset Name

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Dates Available Spatial Resolution (°) Spatial Resolution
(km - approx.)
Coverage LAS ERDDAP THREDDS
Aquarius 2011-2015 100km global monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
monthly
weekly
Aquarius made NASA's first space-based global observations of ocean surface salinity in 2011, flying 657 kilometers (408 miles) above Earth in a sun-synchronous polar orbit that repeated every seven days. The Aquarius/SAC-D mission was developed collaboratively between NASA and Argentina's space agency, Comisión Nacional de Actividades Espaciales (CONAE). Because ocean surface salinity varies from place to place and over time, scientists are using it to trace the ocean's role in Earth's water cycle. For example, about 86% of global evaporation and 78% of global precipitation occur over the ocean. By measuring changes in ocean surface salinity caused by these processes, as well as changes caused by melting ice and river runoff, Aquarius has provided important new information about how Earth's freshwater moves between the ocean and atmosphere and around the globe. Aquarius has also helped scientists track ocean currents and better understand ocean circulation. Together with temperature, salinity controls the density of seawater, determining whether it sinks or floats.
On June 7, 2015, the SAC-D satellite carrying Aquarius suffered a power supply failure, ending the mission.

Monitoring Datasets

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Dataset Name

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Variable Dates Available Temporal Resolution Spatial Resolution
(km - approx.)
Coverage Image gallery
AVHRR/HRPT SST last 8 days up to 8 times/day 1.1km Hawai‘i Hawai‘i
Main Hawaiian Islands
Kaua‘i
O‘ahu - Maui
Big Island
The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) dataset provides sea-surface temperature data collected over the Hawaiian Archipelago by means of a remote satellite receiving station located in Ewa Beach, O'ahu. This dataset is acquired up to 8 times a day with a spatial resolution of 1.1 km at nadir. The hourly acquisition times are defined by the orbit characteristic of each satellite as well as the number of operational satellites within the POES satellite constellation. Historical data is available from NOAA's Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS).
AVHRR/HRPT True Colors last 15 days up to 4 times/day 1.1km Hawai‘i Hawai‘i
Main Hawaiian Islands
Kaua‘i
O‘ahu - Maui
Big Island
Using the data collected by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) sensor, it is possible to combine various AVHRR spectral channels that most resemble the range of the human eye, which would result in an image that would be close to what a person would see from space. With the AVHRR, true color composites are only possible to generate during daytime hours, by combining bands 1 (visible), 2 (near InfraRed), and 4 (thermal InfraRed). In this manner, the 1.1 km resolution HRPT data is processed at our node for the generation of true color composites for the Hawaii region.
AVHRR/HRPT Infra-Red last 8 days up to 8 times/day 1.1km Hawai‘i Hawai‘i
Main Hawaiian Islands
Kaua‘i
O‘ahu - Maui
Big Island
The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) instrument collects data in various spectral channels that are capable of measuring emitted and/or reflected energy at various spectral wavelengths. In this way, by using 1.1 km resolution AVHRR channel 3 (mid-InfraRed) data, it is possible to measure the temperature of features and allow for the discrimination of, for example, land and cloud patterns.
Modis-250m True Colors last 15 days daily 250 m Hawai‘i Main Hawaiian Islands
True color images are derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument, which flies onboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites. The true color images are created using MODIS's red, green, and blue bands. Several types of atmospheric and surface features are evident in true color images, such as clouds, haze, vog, smoke, sunglint, snow, and clear skies. Because true color images are generated from visible wavelengths, they are only available for daylight hours.