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1.  TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-1 and JASON-2 Ocean Altimetry (Sea-Surface Height )
        Ocean altimetry monitoring is conducted primarily by means of data from the NASA TOPEX/Poseidon, JASON-1 and JASON-2 satellite missions, in addition to other satellite altimeters (e.g.: ERS, Envisat). By merging their SSH measurements, it is possible to establish a long record of SSH observations throughout the world's oceans. Furthermore, as demonstrated by Polovina et al. (1999), SSH data can be used for deriving geostrophic currents for gaining further insights regarding the ocean surface circulation dynamics. The SSH data used is the AVISO Delayed-Time Reference Mean Sea-Level Anomaly (MSLA) product that combines data from TOPEX/Poseidon/ERS, Jason-1/Envisat and Jason-2/Envisat. In addition, the AVISO Near Real-Time MSLA Jason-2 dataset is also used for supplementing the Delayed-Time products when these are unavailable. The SSH data hereby distributed contains MSLA data in addition to the Niiler (2003) sea-surface height climatology. Using this information, geostrophic currents are subsequently derived following the methods by Polovina et al. (1999). The resulting dataset contains global data at a spatial resolution of 0.25 degrees (SSH) and 0.5 degrees (geostrophic currents), and is available from October 2002 through the present as 7-day and monthly composites.


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Product Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
   Altimetry (Sea-Surface Height) Oct. 1992 - Present Oct. 1992 - Present
  Geostrophic Currents (u-component) Oct. 1992 - Present Oct. 1992 - Present
  Geostrophic Currents (v-component) Oct. 1992 - Present Oct. 1992 - Present



2.  Empirical Orthogonal Function (EOF) Ocean Variability Indicator - Ocean Altimetry
        Empirical Orthogonal Functions - or EOFs - are used by oceanographers as a tool for identifying changes within the oceans caused by climate variability. These types of changes often have large spatial and temporal scales. Therefore, the use of EOFs with ocean altimetry (SSH) data allows for the statistical characterization of the spatial and temporal variations observed within the SSH dataset for the Pacific Basin. In this way, EOFs provide a percentage measure for the amount of variance detected. This statistical information allows for subsequent study and interpretation of the detected variations.

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SST
                                     
1.  AVHRR Pathfinder v4.1  Sea-Surface Temperature
        The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite sensor onboard the NOAA satellite constellation have been collecting sea-surface temperature (SST) measurements since 1985. The NOAA/NASA AVHRR Pathfinder v4.1dataset utilizes data from the sensor's five individual bands for deriving SSTs. Our current data catalog contains global Pathfinder data at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degrees (approximately 8 km per pixel). The dataset is composed of SST measurements from descending passes (nighttime) during the period January 1985 through January 2003, and are available as weekly and monthly composites.


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Product Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
AVHRR Pathfinder v4.1 SST Jan. 1985 - May 2003 Jan. 1985 - May 2003



2.  AVHRR Pathfinder v5 and v5.1  Sea-Surface Temperature
        The NOAA/NASA AVHRR Pathfinder v5 and v5.1 sea-surface temperature dataset represents an enhanced SST product that includes improved accuracy as well as higher spatial resolution. At 0.05 degrees per pixel (approximately 4 km/pixel), this dataset provides a global spatial coverage ranging from 1982 - 2009. Our data holdings include descending passes (nighttime) during the period January 1982 through  December 2009, and are available as weekly and monthly composites.

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Product Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
AVHRR Pathfinder v5 and v5.1 SST Aug. 1982 - Dec. 2009 Sep. 1982 - Dec. 2009



3.  AVHRR Global Area Coverage (GAC) Sea-Surface Temperature
    The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - Global Area Coverage (GAC) dataset provide global sea-surface temperature data at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degrees (approximately 8 km per pixel). The AVHRR-GAC data is collected by the NOAA POES satellite constellation and utilizes data from the sensor's five individual bands. Data coverage ranges from January 2003 through the present, and is available as 3-day, weekly and monthly composites.

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Product 3-Day Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
AVHRR-GAC SST Jan. 2003 - Present Jan. 2003 - Present Jan. 2003 - Present

                                       


4.  AVHRR High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) Sea-Surface Temperature
        The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT)  dataset provide sea-surface temperature data collected over the Hawaiian Archipelago by means of  remote satellite receiving station located in Ewa Beach, Oahu, which is operated remotely by our node. This dataset is acquired up to 8 times a day with a spatial resolution of  1.1 km at nadir. The hourly acquisition times are defined by the orbit characteristic of each satellite as well as the number of operational satellites within the POES satellite constellation. Historical data is available from NOAA's Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS).


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5.  GOES Sea-Surface Temperature

        The radiometer sensor onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) maintained by NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Servicecollects sea-surface temperature data every 2 hours for the Hawaii region. The data is the downloaded and relayed for distribution. At present, our data archive contains GOES SST data at a resolution of 0.05 degrees (approximately 4 km per pixel). The data is available since 1 January 2001 through the present, and exists as 2-day, 7-day and monthly composites. The high temporal and spatial resolution of the GOES SST dataset allows for the monitoring of oceanographic eddies that occur off the main Hawaiian Islands by means of the NOAA OceanWatch - EddyWatch monitoring program.

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Product 2-Day Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
GOES SST Jan. 2001 - Present Jan. 2001 - Present Jan. 2001 - Present




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1. MODIS AQUA Ocean Color (Chlorophyll-a Concentration)
        The NASA Aqua satellite contains the MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro- radiometer) sensor that is used for detecting chlorophyll-a concentrations (ocean color) in the world's oceans, among other applications. This NASA ocean color dataset is available from our data catalog as global 7-day and monthly composites at a spatial resolution of 0.05 degrees (approximately 4km per pixel). The data is available since July 2002 through the present.

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Product Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
Aqua Ocean Color (Chla) Jul. 2002 - Present Jul. 2002 - Present



2. SeaWiFS Ocean Color (Chlorophyll-a Concentration)
        The NASA SeaWiFS sensor onboard the satellite GeoEye was used for detecting and measuring global sea-surface chlorophyll-a concentrations throughout the world's oceans from 1997 through 2010. During this time, the satellite was able to establish an unprecedented time series of global chlorophyll-a concentrations. Our data holdings include global 7-day and monthly composites at a spatial resolution of 0.1 degrees (approximately 9 km/pixel).

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Product Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
SeaWiFS Ocean Color (Chla) Aug. 1997 - Dec. 2010 Aug. 1997 - Dec 2010



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1. ASCAT Ocean Surface Winds
        The Advanced Scatterometer (ASCAT) sensor onboard the EUMETSAT MetOp polar-orbiting satellite provides ocean surface wind observations by means of radar scatterometry. The data is available as 2-day composites with global coverage at 0.25 degrees (approximately 25 km/pix). Total wind speed, as well as zonal and meridional wind speed information is available since September 2010 through the present.


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Product 2-Day
QuikSCAT Wind - Wind Speed Sep. 2010 - Present
QuikSCAT Wind - Wind Speed Convergence Sep. 2010 - Present
QuikSCAT Wind - Zonal Wind Speed Sep. 2010 - Present




2. QuikSCAT Ocean Surface Winds
       In June 1999 NASA launched the Quik Scatterometer (QuikSCAT) satellite containing the SeaWinds radar sensor. This instrument allowed for the retreival of near-surface wind information over the oceans, and their orbit characteristics allow for a complete coverage of the planet every 24 hours. Our data holdings contain QuikSCAT data provided by the French Research Institute for Exploitation of the Sea (IFREMER). The archive consist of global data collected at 3-day (global coverage), 7-day and monthly composites with a spatial resolution of 0.5 degrees.


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Product 3-Day Weekly (7-Day) Monthly
QuikSCAT Wind - Wind Speed Jul. 1999 - Oct. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Aug. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Wind Speed Convergence -------- Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Zonal Wind Speed Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Meridional Wind Speed Jul. 1999 - Oct. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Wind Stress Curl -------- Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Wind Stress Jul. 1999 - Oct. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Zonal Wind Stress Jul. 1999 - Oct. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009
QuikSCAT Wind - Meridional Wind Stress Jul. 1999 - Oct. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009 Jul. 1999 - Nov. 2009



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1.  AVHRR High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) True Color Composites
        Using the data collected by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) sensor, it is possible to combine various AVHRR spectral channels that most resemble the range of the human eye, which would result in an image that would be close to what a person would see from space. With the AVHRR, true color composites are only possible to generate during daytime hours, by combining bands 1 (visible), 2 (near InfraRed), and 4 (thermal InfraRed). In this manner, the 1.1 km resolution HRPT data is processed at our node for the generation of true color composites for the Hawaii region.


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2.  AVHRR High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) Infrared Imagery
        The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) - High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT)  instrument collects data in various spectral channels that are capable of measuring emitted and/or reflected energy at various spectral wavelengths. In this way, by using  1.1 km resolution AVHRR channel 3 (mid-InfraRed) data, it is possible to measure the temperature of features and allow for the discrimination of, for example, land and cloud patterns.


HRPT IR

 

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1.  Bathymetry & Topography Data (Smith & Sandwell v8.2)
        Gridded 2-minute topography/bathymetry dataset generated by Smith & Sandwell (v8.2). Dataset utilizes in-situ and satellite-derived measurements for predicting water depths.

 

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2.  Levitus Climatological Atlas of the World Ocean
        The dataset consists of global monthly temperature and salinity climatologies with a spatial resolution of 1x1 degree, and conists of 19 levels (surface - 1000m). It was created by Sydney Levitus (1982) and includes a synthesis of all temperature, salinity and oxygen
data available from the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC).

 

HRPT IR



3.  COADS Climatology
        COADS (Comprehensive Ocean-Atmosphere Data Set) is a ocean-atmosphere data set generated by means of in-situ (ship) measurements and reports from around the world's oceans. The dataset consists of monthly climatologies from data collected between 1946 - 1989, and was developed by NOAA's Climate Diagnostics Center (CDC) and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), and NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC).

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